fbpx
back bounded-next cafe calendar-large calendar cart close coat-check collapse donate download elevators expand explore filter grid-view hamburger heart hours join link list-view location mail more next nursing-room phone print programs ramp restrooms right-arrow search share shop thumbs-down thumbs-up tickets up toilet heart-filled zoom Skip to Content

The Drunkenness of Bacchus

European Art

Search and Share Tools

The Drunkenness of Bacchus

Artwork Details

Artist/Maker

Albert-Ernest Carrier-Belleuse
French, 1824–1887

Date

ca. 1870s

Medium

Terracotta

Accession #

1998.93

Dimensions

Please contact the Museum for more information.

Location

Currently Not on View

Description

Carrier-Belleuse, the teacher of Auguste Rodin, turned toward the art of the Baroque and
Rococo periods for inspiration rather than Neoclassicism. This was largely due to the efforts of Carrier-Belleuse and his fellow artist Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux that a new, more dynamic sculptural style emerged in France in the 1860s and 1870s. The Drunkenness of Bacchus, which depicts Bacchus, the Roman god of wine, riding a donkey and surrounded by nymphs and putti, exemplifies this new style. The exuberant gestures of the figures animate the sculpture, while terracotta, the artist’s preferred medium, gives the work added warmth.

Credit

Purchase with funds from the Phoenix Society